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Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Tim Kaine and J Street

Hat tip Paul Schnee


On the outside, Tim Kaine appears to be a moderate, center left sort of politician. The former governor of Virginia speaks fluent Spanish (He lived for awhile in Honduras) and has not accumulated a career of silly statements in the manner of Nancy Pelosi, Maxine Waters or Harry Reid.

Yet, a look deeper into Kaine reveals some troubling facts, such as his support for revolutionary forces in Central America in the 1980s and the very troubling support he gets from the organization J Street. In case you don't know, J Street is one of the more deceptive organizations in America. Its slogan is "Pro-Israel, Pro-Peace". In reality, this Jewish organization is anti-Israel in every aspect of the Israel-Palestinian conflict. They consistently take pro-Palestinian positions at the expense of the Jewish state. By contrast, Jewish Voice for Peace (in spite of its name) openly proclaims their opposition to Israel and often engages in anarchistic protests in the US to further their cause. J Street operates under a cloak of responsibility and even-handedness. It is a false illusion.

Caroline Glick of the Jerusalem Post has an article on Kaine that highlights his support not only from J Street, but from President Obama as well. It quotes Clinton critic Edward Klein in that Obama conditioned his support for Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign on her choosing Kaine as her running mate.

http://m.jpost.com/Opinion/Our-world-Tim-Kaine-Clinton-and-three-dead-GIs-471948#article=6017QzAwMjA5NDQ4NUY4MzdEM0ZFOTFCRjBDREM4Q0M0Mzg=

Glick is decidedly pro-Israel and has incurred the wrath of the pro-Palestinian forces. She has the courage to speak out strongly, and I agree with her views. I had already known about Kaine's  support for Marxist liberation theology during the 1980s, but I didn't realize he was supported by J Street. That just makes things even tougher for Israel in a Clinton-Kaine administration.


1 comment:

Siarlys Jenkins said...

What's so bad about supporting revolutionary movements in Central America in the 1980s? Those were movements with broad popular support, fighting vicious kleptocratic oligarchies that badly needed to be overthrown.